reducing furrow irrigation erosion with polyacrylamide (1997

Reducing Furrow Irrigation Erosion with Polyacrylamide (PAM)

Reducing Furrow Irrigation Erosion with Polyacrylamide (PAM) R. E. Sojka* and R. D. Lentz Irrigated cropping is a critical component of global agricul-tural production. Surface irrigation—most of it furrow irriga-tion—accounts for >60% of Earth's 600 million irrigated acres. Erosion threatens irrigation's ability to maintain its 2X

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Reducing Furrow Irrigation Erosion with Polyacrylamide (PAM)

There has been a large shift to sprinkler irrigation in the USA. Beyond labor considerations, this has been driven by soil and water resource conservation. Some crops, however, do not tolerate wet canopies (e.g., seed beans).

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Reducing furrow irrigation erosion with polyacrylamide (PAM)

Furrow irrigation-induced erosion is nearly halted by small additions of water-soluble polyacrylamide (PAM) to irrigation water. PAM is an environmentally safe flocculent used extensively in municipal water treatment, paper manufacturing, food processing, and other sensitive applications.

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Reducing furrow irrigation erosion with polyacrylamide (1997)

Small amounts of a specific class of polyacrylamide (PAM) copolymer can vir-tually halt furrow irrigation-induced erosion. Net infiltration is also improved (infiltration rate does not decline, compared with untreated water) while man-agement options are broadened.

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Reducing Furrow Irrigation Erosion with Polyacrylamide (PAM)

If inexpensive, effective, easyerosion control were available, many furrow irrigation farmers could improveresource conservation and water management.Small amounts of a specific class of polyacrylamide (PAM) copolymer can vir-tually halt furrow irrigation-induced erosion.

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Erosion Control in Furrow Irrigation Using Polyacrylamide

Erosion Control in Furrow Irrigation Using Polyacrylamide 281 of the double layer, the range of the repulsiv e forces is greatly reduced (Van Olphen, 1977), thereby promoting flocculation. Fig. 1. Molecular structure of anionic polyacrylamide Several studies have shown that PAM dissolved in irrigation water at a rate of 10 kg ha-1

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Reducing furrow irrigation erosion with polyacrylamide (PAM)

Journal Article Reducing furrow irrigation erosion with polyacrylamide (PAM) [1997] Sojka, R.E. (USDA, ARS, Northwest Irrig. and Soils Res. Lab, Kimberly, ID.); Access the full text NOT AVAILABLE Lookup at Google Scholar

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(PDF) Preventing Irrigation Furrow Erosion with Small

Furrow irrigation-induced erosion is nearly eliminated by small additions of water-soluble polyacrylamide (PAM) to irrigation water. PAM is an environmentally safe industrial flocculent widely used in municipal water treatment, paper manufacturing, food processing and other sensitive applications.

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Reducing furrow irrigation erosion with polyacrylamide (PAM)

Furthermore, the capital cost, energy use, and technological requirements are out of the reach of many U.S. and third world irrigators. If inexpensive, effective, easy erosion control were available, many furrow irrigation farmers could improve resource conservation and water management.

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Reducing Furrow Irrigation Erosion with Polyacrylamide (PAM)

Polyacrylamide (PAM) has been an effective, economical erosion preventative under a variety of field conditions (Fig. 1) when dissolved at 10 g/m 3 in the advance phase (only) of furrow irrigation inflow streams (Lentz et al., 1992; Lentz and Sojka, 1994b; Lentz, 1996). Polyacrylamide copolymers having molecular weights of 12-15 Mg/mol and

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Polyacrylamide preparations for protection of water quality

Furrow irrigation . can be a major contributor to soil . loss. Reducing soil erosion on vulnerable acres can help maintain topsoil for future generations. Furrow irrigation results in greater loss because, unlike a center pivot system, furrow irrigation uses soil as the transmission line, distrib - uting water along the irrigation furrow

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Controlling Runoff and Erosion in Sloping Land with

polyacrylamide application with irrigation water. Applying anionic polyacrylamide (PAM) at 1 to 2 kg PAM ha-1 reduced furrow irrigation erosion by more than 90% (Lentz et al., 1992; Trout et al., 1995; Sojka and Lentz, 1997). The PAM application can also reduce total and soluble phosphorus loss in furrow irrigation runoff (Lentz et al., 1998).

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The effect of supplemental irrigation from polyacrylamide

PAM and Herbicides The influence of polyacrylamide on the movement of soil-applied herbicides in furrow-irrigated dry bean (Phaseolus vulgaris). "Using polyacrylamide (PAM) in surface irrigation can reduce soil erosion from furrow irrigated fields by 94% and increase infiltration by 15%. However, little is known how PAM may influence the

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Polyacrylamide: A Review of the Use, Effectiveness, and Cost

This paper reports on the effectiveness of the additions of high molecular weight, anionic, polyacrylamide (PAM) to irrigation water to minimise off-site movement of endosulfan, chlorothalonil, bupirimate, and atrazine.

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Reducing Furrow Irrigation Erosion with Polyacrylamide (PAM)

To reduce the total amount of soil lost due to furrow irrigation, sediment loss on any potentially erodible field must also be reduced. Topsoil loss can mean a long-term reduction in soil productivity, crop yield and the life expectancy of down- stream storage reservoirs.

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PAM in Furrow Irrigation, an Erosion Control Breakthrough

Polyacrylamide (PAM) has been an effective, economical erosion preventative under a variety of field conditions (Fig. 1) when dissolved at 10 g/m 3 in the advance phase (only) of furrow irrigation inflow streams (Lentz et al., 1992; Lentz and Sojka, 1994b; Lentz, 1996). Polyacrylamide copolymers having molecular weights of 12-15 Mg/mol and

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PAM Research : USDA ARS

"Using polyacrylamide (PAM) in surface irrigation can reduce soil erosion from furrow irrigated fields by 94% and increase infiltration by 15%. However, little is known how PAM may influence the movement of soil-applied herbicides.

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Controlling Runoff and Erosion in Sloping Land with

Polyacrylamide (PAM) is a chemical polymer used for a variety of purposes. Non agricultural uses of PAM include waste and potable water treatment, processing and washing of fruits and vegetables, clarification of juices, manufacturing of cosmetics, and paper production.

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The effect of supplemental irrigation from polyacrylamide

David Pyke Tackifiers are long‐chain carbon compounds used for soil stabilization and hydroseeding and could provide a vehicle for biological soil crust restoration.

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Polyacrylamide: A Review of the Use, Effectiveness, and Cost

Erosion prevention has been shown to result from stabilized soilstructure in the i to 5 mm veneer of surface soil that regulates infiltration, runoff, and sedimentloss on water application. We hypothesized that this could be confirmed from scanning electronmicrographs (SEMs) of PAM-treated soil.

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